Celebrating the Launch of The Legend of Korra

Legend of Korra

Filed: Games, PlatinumGames, The Legend of Korra

Hi, everyone! How are you?
This is Eiro Shirahama, director of The Legend of Korra.

I can’t believe it’s been this long since I first saw Korra and fell in love with her.

After a tough development period, the game was finally released one month ago on 10/21 in the US and 10/22 in Europe.
Please try it on Steam, XBLA or the PS Store, if you haven’t already!

It’s a budget title, but it still manages to maintain that sharp and fast-paced action you’ve come to expect from us!

What’s that? You need more Platinum in your life!?
Well, Bayonetta 2 was released on 10/24 as well, so there’s a double serving of PlatinumGames goodness just waiting to be scooped up!

I’d like to thank all of the wonderful people who worked on The Legend of Korra. I couldn’t have done it without you!

I also want to give a great big hug to Robert Conkey, producer extraordinaire at Activision for giving us so much freedom in making this game. Thanks, buddy!

Also, lots of love and respect for Mike & Brian, creators of the original Avatar series. Your work is amazing, guys!

Thanks to everyone at Nickelodeon as well! The chocolate cake we had in San Diego was delicious!

And the biggest thanks of all to all of you fine people who downloaded the game!
I love each and every one of you!!

IMG_3568(Text on cake: Avatar State!!)

Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , ,

The Climax Situation Process

BAYONETTA 2

Filed: Bayonetta 2

Hi, my name is Hirono Sato, I was a game designer who planned the “Climax Situations” in Bayonetta 2.

We’ve tried our best to have just as many impactful game play situations in Bayonetta 2 as we did in the original. Just how did we do it? I’ll illustrate that here with some examples.

 

Define your Objective.

The first Climax Situation I worked on in Bayonetta 2 was the fight with the giant dragon angel boss Glamor.

paul01

Director Yusuke Hashimoto’s Glamor concept art

I was asked to take this boss and think of a way to fight it that would really blow people away.

When I was assigned to this boss fight, there were actually two versions of it already. The problem was, the director wasn’t a terribly big fan of either of them and was asking me to rework some of what wasn’t interesting about it. You usually get problems like this in development; I always deal with them with the following mindset—

You can’t make something lackluster fun with just a little fix.

Sometimes, you have to look over the entire problem from another angle.

I know that the team tries their best. But if something is boring, it needs to be given a complete facelift.

The problem with the proposed Glamor boss fights when I started working on them was that neither of them felt fast-paced or suspenseful enough. So I got an idea that appeared in the original Bayonetta as well, surfing.

In the first Bayonetta, you fight this giant boss while surfing and I wondered to myself if we couldn’t make something similar work for Bayonetta 2.

At this point in development we already had the plans for a “mysterious youth” character that Bayonetta needed to chase after and save, so there was no problem justifying a surfing battle with regards to the scenario.

Also, this is obvious, but in order to surf, you need water to surf on. At first we were thinking of having Bayonetta fight Glamor inside some kind of whirlpool, but that was the same idea they used in the original Bayonetta, so I wanted to try something different.

Eventually I came to the idea that if Glamor has this dragon-like appearance, maybe we could incorporate a tornado somehow (Japanese: Dragon-竜 Tornado-竜巻). Yeah… like a tornado of water…

paul02

Concept art by our artist Kan, back when the fight was planned to be inside a whirlpool.

 

Implement the Idea into the Game.

We had the basic concepts for the fight: Surfing, chasing Glamor, fighting on a tornado made of water. The next step was to combine these ideas and implement them into the game. It’s very important that you’re careful here to not ruin your perfectly good ideas when you try to build them inside the game.

Fortunately, one of our artists created an awesome piece of concept art depicting Bayonetta surfing on a tornado, chasing after Glamor. All we had to do was bring this work to life within the game.

paul03

Concept art surfing on a tornado of water

Since we couldn’t really have the exact same combat here as the rest of the game, we made the fight principally about dodging debris from buildings destroyed by Glamor. Though, if you were just doing this the whole fight you’d probably get pretty burned out, so we made sure there was a section halfway through where you could just wail on her.

 

Think of What Else You Can Add.

Now that we had our basic layout for the fight, next we had to think about how we were going to give it a climactic ending.

What about having the the tornado shoot up into the sky and end the fight in a “sea of clouds”? With that wording, it probably wouldn’t be unnatural if we had Glamor swimming around in there, and that would be pretty epic too.

Since Glamor is essentially running away from you in this fight, we also figured it’d create a healthy dose of suspense if we were able to express “if she gets this far, it’s over” somehow. Well, since we’re fighting an angel in the sky, why not have a door to Paradiso then?

The director and some of the rest of the staff, however, were not appeased. A lot of people spoke up and said, “I think we’re tired of seeing Glamor at this point.” Honestly, I kind of felt the same way.

“We needed something more!” Well, when you’re making a game, you hear that a lot. Whether you can do something about it or not, sets the pro game designers apart from the rest. When this happens, I don’t want to just make a gimmicky change, I want to add something that wasn’t there before. So instead of trying to change something about Glamor’s moveset and so on, I multiplied Glamor into three and had you fight all of them at the same time.
We’re nearing Paradiso, the enemy base, so I thought it would only be natural if the player was encountering more angels. I think this was successful in giving the fight a stronger sense of urgency/peril.

paul04

This is just one of the dozens of Climax Situations that we’ve included in Bayonetta, so do yourself a favor and try it out more than once, try it out multiple times—I hope you can get as much enjoyment out of it as possible.

Tagged: , , , , , , , , ,

Bayonetta 2 Storyboards!

BAYONETTA 2

Filed: Bayonetta 2

Hi guys.

This is Bayonetta 2’s director, Yusuke Hashimoto.

How’s everyone enjoying the game?

 

The game has already been out in the west for two weeks, so now I’m getting bombarded with messages from all sides of the globe! Thanks so much, everyone!

I’m writing a special blog this time to introduce some of the storyboards I wrote for the game. Let’s give one scene a look:ゴモラ登場_00_ゴモラ登場_01ゴモラ登場_02ゴモラ登場_03_

These are the storyboards for the Gomorrah boss battle at the beginning of the game.

I drew them after it was decided that we were going to have a playable demo at Nintendo’s booth for E3, the first actual footage of the game to be shown to the public. Only, we hadn’t done any voice recording at this time, so I was a little curious as to how things were going to come together.

 

E3 2013 Demo (Gomorrah fight starts around 9:20)

This is a video recorded for IGN Live. The playable portion consisted of three parts: the jet battle, train battle, and then the Gomorrah fight. We designed each scene so transitions would require as little dialogue as possible.

Sometime after E3, we eventually finished voice recording and went back and worked voice back into the scenes. Might be pretty interesting to watch them back to back and see how they differ.

 

I now realize that doing these first storyboards for E3 helped us figure out some key parts of the game, such as how bosses should be introduced, and how to move from one part of the game to the next at a pace that doesn’t hurt the action.

 

Keep enjoying Bayonetta 2. See you again!

 

Tagged: , , , ,

W101: Super Secret Codes

The Wonderful 101

Filed: The Wonderful 101

Hey, everyone.

It’s Ichi here! Remember me!?

Can you believe it’s already been 2 weeks since Bayonetta 2 released!?

Sometimes people tell me that game is the sole reason they bought a Wii U! Of course that makes us really, really happy, but while you’re at it, why not try The Wonderful 101 as well!? (Although I guess if you’re here on this site, reading this, you probably already have…)

Right, with that out of the way, I have a secret to share with you today!

We’ve been getting some messages here and there from people who are having trouble unlocking Wonder-Bayonetta in The Wonderful 101.

And with good reason! Out of all of the hidden characters in this game, Wonder-Bayo is by far the most difficult to get your hands on.

Our raven-haired beauty only shows herself to those who find all of the hidden items, fight the toughest enemies, and overcome the hardest challenges: only the most persistent and indomitable heroes!

 

In other words, one of the main reasons we put her in this game is that most elusive of holy grails in the world of video games: BRAGGING RIGHTS. You want to show off? You gotta WORK for it, buster! That’s how your efforts are rewarded.

So if you know someone who’s struggling to unlock this character, I’m terribly sorry, but you’re going to have to tell them this:

“UNITE UP OR SHIP OUT.”

Yeah. That’s right.

You think Bayonetta is the kind of gal that lets herself get unlocked by just mashing your palms on the controller for a couple of hours?

THINK AGAIN.

*************************

Originally, this is where this new blog post was going to end.

However, just as I was hovering my cursor over that alluring “Publish” button, my index finger poised to deliver the decisive left-click, Kamiya walked past my desk, glanced over my shoulder, and nonchalantly remarked: “You know there’s a code for that, right?”

 

I… uh… Wut?

 

Kamiya: “Yeah, you know, the cheat code? Didn’t we already tell people about this?”

Ichi: “Cheat… Co… duh?”

This is where I incurred the wrath of Kamiya, and he decided to grab me by my neck and drag me out into the backyard. “Don’t tell me you forgot about this?” he asked me with a smile that could freeze a raging volcano. I responded thusly:

“I’m absolutely amazed, Kamiya-san! (That you still remembered)

You came by with absolutely impeccable timing! (Even though it’s been over a year since the game was released)

I just wrote a blog on that very subject! (Just let me delete the entire text first)”

But the timing IS actually quite fortunate, since we just released Bayonetta 2, and the world is still in a Witch Time-induced craze, so if we’re going to reveal a secret code related to Bayonetta, surely the perfect timing would be NOW, since a lot of people have freshly purchased Wii Us in their homes, and now that plenty of them will probably already have finished Bayonetta 1 and/or 2, it is highly likely that they’re looking for something else to point their Scarborough Fairs and/or Love is Blues at and so this is the ideal opportunity to let people know that they can in fact play as the renowned Umbran Witch in a completely different type of over-the-top action extravaganza and…

I think I’m starting to ramble a bit.

So without further ado, I present to you:

The Super Confidential “Buying Hidden Characters In The Wonderful 101” Platinum Cheat Code That Totally Nobody Knows About Because It’s A Secret To Everybody!

You’re going to have to meet these conditions first though:

- You need to have completed the game (it’s fine if you did it on a low difficulty!)

- You’ll need a boatload of O-Parts. And we’re talking a BIG boat here. Like, one of the fancy ones with a swimming pool and casino and everything.

- The cheat code has to be entered in very specific areas of the game.

- The cheat code is always the same though: Hold down ZR and press ↑↓↑→←XBYA

(Just imagine that you’re using the d-pad to draw the P+ logo!)

If you managed to pull it off correctly, you’ll hear a familiar jingle, and you’ll be able to use the secret characters from the next stage on!

centinels_set

■ CENTINELS Set

Location: Starting position of the Prologue

Secret characters: Wonder-Captain, Wonder-Scarf, Wonder-Gramps

Special price: 1000000P

rival_set

■ Rivals Set

Location: Operation 009-B, starting position of the battle with the shield-generating device

Secret characters: Prince Vorkken, Chewgi, Immorta

Limited-Time-Only deal: 1000000P

memories_set

■ The Olden Days Set

Location: Operation 006-B, during the battle with Laambo, the position shown in the picture above (use the bowl of noodle soup as a guide!)

Secret characters: Wonder-Daddy, Wonder-Future, Wonder-Red (Emeritus)

Super cheap price: 1000000P

newcome_set

■ Real Superheroes Set

Location: During the Epilogue, right after the first car is cut off

Secret characters: Wonder-Goggles, Poseman, Wonder-Director

We-Might-As-Well-Give-Them-Away deal: 1000000P

 

bayo_set

■ Bayo Setta

Location: Starting point of Operation 001

Secret characters: Wonder-Bayonetta, Wonder-Jeanne, Wonder-Rodin

Premium price: 2000000P

If you’ve already completed Bayonetta 1 and 2 and you still haven’t had enough of the time-twisting hair-weaving witch, but you just can’t seem to unlock all of those bottle caps in The Wonderful 101 either, just use the above code and you should be fine and dandy.

And you can still just go out and brag about it! Yay!

See you next time, everyone!

Tagged: , , , , , ,

Designing the Collaboration Costumes

Bayonetta

Filed: Bayonetta

Hello, I was the Nintendo costume collaboration designer for the Bayonetta Wii U port, my name is Yong-Hee Cho. For this blog, I’d like to talk about the design process for creating these costumes.

It all started one day when Kamiya walked up to my desk and said, “Hey Cho. Draw Bayonetta in a Princess Peach outfit for me. Thanks.”

He walked off to leave me thinking to myself, “P-p-p-princess Peach and Bayonetta? How am I supposed to find the common ground between these two characters!? They’re like night and day…”

At the same time, I was intrigued, and wanted to try to design something for two characters that different.

So, she was the first character I started out with. I decided to first just draw Bayonetta, so I’d have a base design to work off I could “dress up” in other costumes.

cho_001

(Really, it’s not necessary to go this far, but… I wanted to.)

Next, I put together some various costume ideas for Kamiya to look at. Right now, we’re still at very rough concept art.

cho_002

Personally, I thought it’d be fun to rearrange the Peach look a little bit, but Kamiya wanted it to be as close to the original as possible, so we ultimately went with (F).

He also requested two revisions:

  • Don’t let her hair down like that.
  • Attach a Mario charm somewhere.

 

This is how the Mario charm turned out.

cho_003

Here’s what Bayonetta looked like after I incorporated his feedback.

cho_004

I used this Peach to make the Daisy costume (Daisy has Luigi instead of Mario, of course).

cho_005

The next costume I did was for Samus Aran of Metroid fame. I’m really into mechanics, so I had the most fun designing this costume.

Here’s the first piece I drew.

cho_006

When Kamiya took a look at it, he said he wanted it to be the Powered Suit from the first Metroid game for NES. The original Metroid is around 30 years old now so unfortunately there’s not a whole lot of artwork to base my design on. I ended up just studying the game sprite and package art. This is how it turned out.

cho_007

It’s supposed to have more of a retro look. What do you think?

 

As I designed these costumes, I would think, when we have the player transforming into Peach, wouldn’t it be cool if we could change game play up somehow as well? Then, one day I thought, what about having Bowser’s punches and kicks be used for Bayonetta’s Wicked Weaves? I pitched the idea to Kamiya and he said “sounds good, do it.” The next idea I thought of was having Samus Bayonetta change to her Morph Ball. This, unfortunately, didn’t make it into Bayonetta Wii U, but… it did make it into Bayonetta 2! Thinking of these little extras is really one of the rewarding parts of working in games.

cho_008

Here’s what the Morph Ball looks like. Those red parts are kinda based on the 8-bit graphics of the first Morph Ball from Metroid.

 

Last is Link. I don’t think this costume was a grand departure from his design, so Kamiya approved of it quickly. All of these costumes, however, needed to be run by Nintendo as well.

cho_009

When I gave the designs to Nintendo to check, I was worried about how “kid-friendly” Bayonetta looked. Like, I didn’t think it’d be a good idea to show too much cleavage, you know… but when Nintendo looked at my Link design, they actually suggested to me to open up her top a little more… Wow.

cho_010

Here’s what the final approved design looked like.

cho_011

Overall, I think I was able to keep Bayonetta’s personality in these new arrangements, so I was pretty pleased. Each costume comes with different sounds and visual effects as well, so be sure to check them out in both games. Thanks for reading! See you again.

Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Bayonetta 2 Out In Stores!

BAYONETTA 2

Filed: Bayonetta 2

Hi everyone, this is Bayonetta 2’s director, Yusuke Hashimoto.

It’s been five long years… finally Bayonetta 2 is finally out in North America and Europe! I guess some of you might be playing it right now!

Bayo2_SS_140603_008

I’ve been overjoyed to receive so many messages from all of you on my twitter (PG_y_hashimoto). Thanks so much. During production, those messages helped me out a lot, and now, I’m just thinking… I can’t believe it’s finally on sale. This will be the first title I’ve worked on that will hit the stores in five years.

I remember writing “See you next stage!” in the staff comments for The Eyes of Bayonetta, the art book for the original game. Back then I just meant for it to pertain to whatever next game I worked on. I never dreamed it would come to mean me directing the sequel to Bayonetta.

A lot has happened in five years. Going from producer to director, moving to a new console… there was a lot of trial and error involved in moving forward, but I think we were able to give so much to the final product because we always believed, we want as many people as possible to enjoy Bayonetta 2.

This time around, we’re really blown away with all the opportunities we’ve had. We were able to add Japanese audio, so many collaboration costumes with Nintendo, and even a port of Kamiya’s original classic to the package… honestly, a deal like this feels too good to be true.

I hope you all enjoy Bayonetta 2.

See you on my next PlatinumGames’ project!

Yusuke Hashimoto

Tagged: , , , , , , ,

A Little Help From Your Friends

BAYONETTA 2

Filed: Bayonetta 2

Hello everyone, my name is Ryoya Sakabe. I’m a game designer here at PlatinumGames. It’s nice to get a chance to write to everyone.

I was a member of the team that made Bayonetta 2. In fact, it was the first game I ever worked on. When I saw my name roll by in the credits I got a little choked up. I had to move all the way from Hokkaido (1,500km away) to work at PlatinumGames, but it was totally worth it!

Alright, enough about me, let’s talk about Bayonetta 2! Today, I would like to focus on team battles!

It goes without saying that there are co-op battles in the new Tag Climax co-op mode. However, there are also scenes in the story mode where you fight alongside A.I. controlled characters. These make for some really exciting battles, and are one of the cool new features Bayonetta 2 brings to the table. You can do crazy torture attacks together, and see some cool teamwork. Definitely keep an eye out for these scenes when you play the game.

Of course, actually getting this feature into the game was a serious challenge. A great example is Loki, a key character in the story of Bayonetta 2. You fight together with him in many battles throughout the game.

sakabe_2_1

(Loki and Bayonetta mid-battle. At first I was so fixated on showing how cool Loki was, I designed him so all his attacks sent enemies flying! I ended up having to tone things down after various members of the team pointed out how ridiculous it was.)

Yet, there was a time when, outside of cut scenes, he only fought in a single scene (the one right after you meet him.)

Fast forward to the last leg of the project. With the deadline looming, I was trying desperately to improve the sections I was in charge of in any way possible. One day, I received a request from Director Hashimoto:

“I want Loki to do more in this part.”

(Note: just what “part” he was referring to, you’ll have to wait and see!)

Where did that come from!? Sure, having two characters fight together had been part of the plan since early in production…but there were schedule constraints to consider, not to mention the effect these battles would have on the game’s tempo.

As the game designer in charge of Loki’s moves, I started to panic. I was concerned that we wouldn’t be able to implement the feature in time. But, putting those fears aside, I decided to take on the challenge.

Why, you ask? Because I knew it would make the game more interesting, that’s why!

And so, Operation Make Loki Less of a Wimp was underway.

Since Loki deftly avoids enemies’ in cut scenes, I decided to have his in-game moves reflect this by allowing him to spin and jump out of the way of attacks, and throw cards while dodging. When planning these moves, I was careful to make sure they didn’t steal the show too much. After all, the star of Bayonetta should always be Bayonetta herself. If Loki is going all out every five seconds, players would not be able to focus on the battle at hand. Loki is a support role, so I made sure that when the player does notice him, it is only to the extent that they can confirm that, yes, he is pulling his weight in battle. Also, if he was too powerful, he would end up finishing off the enemies and stealing the player’s glory. I made sure to balance his strength to make sure the player still feels like they earned their victories.

When one of his attacks connects, it will momentarily stun weak enemies, giving Bayonetta a chance to go in for an attack. He really has your back!

Next, I thought about how to make him act outside of combat. This involved adjusting the speed he moves when leading the player, and the timing of the hints he calls out. My top priority was striking a balance so that players notice the things I want them to see, without making the game stressful to play.

If Loki runs off ahead, you lose the sense of exploring together. On the other hand, if the player is always forced to wait for Loki to catch up, they will quickly get frustrated. It took a lot of trial and error to get this feeling right. Keeping Loki’s character in mind, I tried to add some personality to the way he moves to keep things fresh.

That’s a brief look at how we designed Loki’s character in-game. I would talk with the staff from the various art and programming sections first thing in the morning, and we’d try implementing new ideas and balance them out. Everyone gave it their all to make the game as fun as possible.

After the game was finished, I went back and played the sections where you fight together with Loki. I had this big satisfied grin on my face that I couldn’t seem to get rid of. It was worth the extra effort, without a doubt.

We focused on Loki this time, but the other characters you fight alongside each have their own unique aspects (they had their own set of difficulties to overcome during development.) I hope you find all the team battles exciting as you play Bayonetta 2!

 

Tagged: , , , , , ,

Character Modeling in Bayonetta 2

BAYONETTA 2

Filed: Bayonetta 2

Hey PlatinumGames fans. My name is Tsuyoshi Takahashi, I’m a character modeler for Bayonetta 2.

For this blog I’d like to talk about our creative process behind all the character models of Bayonetta 2. Read on to see how it works.

010_A

Here is a piece of concept art.

Bayonetta’s well known enemy, an angel. Seems pretty twisty and curvy, right? Must be a snake or a dragon or something. Okay, let’s see what we can do with it.

First let’s create this polygon cube.

010_H

Chop it up a bit, give it some shape…

010_B

Draw some textures…

And we’re done! Easy as drawing an owl, right?

010_E

No? Don’t get it?

 

Okay, let’s rewind a sec, back to the start.

010_A

Step 1: Concept art arrives

 

So, when you make something, not just for a game, but anything, you need some kind of direction in your process. When you’re making a 3D model for a game, your direction is usually provided by concept art. Because, first, you have to know what it looks like, right? Different projects will have varying levels of detail for their concept art, but, well, as long as you have one, you can start putting a model together, I guess. So, what exactly does “put together” mean?

I mean, even if you have a still image, there’s a lot of work left to be done. This character is an enemy, so it has to fulfill the role of being a THREAT to the player. So first of all, we have to make it MOVE. All we have is this piece of concept art. From that one image, we have to decide each movement, each attack the enemy can make. This means that part of the model designer’s job is to really understand the minute details of the enemy they are creating. Since it’s snake-like, it’ll probably slink around. Since it’s got wings, obviously it can fly. Does it chomp at the player? Maybe spit something at them? Also, this thing has two faces. Which is the real one? How does it make its appearance in the game, what is its personality, is it male, female…???

Initially, I see what I can come up with by myself.

Step 2: Let’s ask around

 

After we’ve deliberated by ourselves for a bit, next we go and ask other people on the team. Specifically, we ask the game director, and the game designer and character designer of the monster.

Before concept art is completed, the intentions of the director have to be reflected, and the game designer has to decide on the monster’s specs.. All this is worked into the concept. So, by the time it reaches my hands, it’s already passed through a few departments.

Now, if I want to know what this monster’s all about, I suppose the best person to ask is the guy who made it. Fortunately, in Bayonetta 2, the guy who did the monster designs also happens to be the director: Yusuke Hashimoto. As the artist, he obviously also thinks about how each character is going to behave. So he’s basically the director, game designer, and character designer all in one.

Sweet! That makes my life a lot easier!

Step 3: Use your own creativity

 

Here’s what I got out of my conversation with Hashimoto.

This is a “dragon angel.”

It uses breath attacks.

It chomps.

The face on its chest is its real face.

And, it’s a girl.

Technically, angels don’t have sexes, but from its personality, and the look of the face on its chest, it seems feminine.

Now, what kind of textures would this monster have? A monster, of course, is a fictional creature, but when we create it, we have to build it using materials based on what you would find in the real world. The key features that play into this enemy’s texture are the jewel-like scales embroidered all over its body, and the gold skin shared across all angel designs.

Now that I’ve asked around and gotten a feel for the enemy, I think I’m ready to start making him. But wait!! There’s a problem we haven’t addressed yet. What are we going to do about the parts of the enemy we can’t see on the concept art. Sometimes you’ll get concept art that has every inch of the enemy covered, and you can just copy it as-is, but not this time. Where’s its back? What’s the inside of its mouth look like? Guess I’ll have to figure it out myself! This small piece of creative freedom is one part of being a model designer that I love. There are a lot of staff from the original Bayonetta team that I’m sure could have finished the entire drawing for me, but instead, they gave me my own space to play with. So I will!

Step 4: Making a game is a team effort

 

As character design usually has to pass through the director, game designers, and concept artists before it reaches me, after I create a model for it, animators have to give it motion, effect designers have to create effects for its attacks, sound designers have to give it sound effects, and programmers have to program it into the game. What I’m trying to say is, the process I’m involved in is only one small element of the game’s production, and yet if I mess up anything during my process, the entire game will suffer from it. So you can’t just toy around. You have to consider the other legs of the team.

After I’ve finished the model, I pass it along to the animators to give it movement.

That means I have to give my model a skeletal structure so it can move in the first place. Also, there’s a limit to how many bones I’m allowed to include in my model, due to technical limitations, and so on. So I grab the animator and discuss where I need to allot the model’s bones. When I make a model, I have to think about the people who will use it after me, the machine limitations, and my deadline.

010_C

By the way, considering it can use a kind of energy-like breath attack (Ice Breath) and likes gulping down its enemies, I gave the inside of its mouth this kind of mech feel, and I gave a lot of depth to the center, so that it seems like you’ll get swallowed right into the abyss.

010_F

This is how I did the back (tried to build on the jewel scales feel)

010_G

Okay, it’s complete!

010_E

Or at least, you think it is, but sometimes it doesn’t work exactly how it’s supposed to. In these situations, it might get sent back.

Hey, you again! Long time no see! Sure let’s fix you up a bit…

Anyway, that’s about it!

Step 5: Forget everything I’ve just said

 

In conclusion, we learned a lot about model design today, so please forget all of it. Don’t think about the swan’s legs paddling furiously beneath the water’s surface. Just enjoy the way it seems to glide angelically across the lake. What I mean to say is, just enjoy how fun the game is! Don’t sweat the small stuff. Have fun with Bayonetta 2! See you again!

Tagged: , , , , , ,

Bayonetta 2 Nintendo Direct!

BAYONETTA 2

Filed: Bayonetta 2

We’ve finally reached one month before the game’s release. Hope you’re ready for some fast paced climax action!

Did you happen to see the special Bayonetta 2 Nintendo Direct last week? For those who missed out, catch up here:

If you don’t know, Nintendo Direct is a semi-regular news info reel showcasing some of Nintendo’s up and coming titles. Sometimes it tackles multiple titles at once; sometimes it only focuses on one. Last week, there was a 30 minute Direct all about our very own Bayonetta 2.

This Nintendo Direct was hosted by the game’s director, Yusuke Hashimoto, and… none other than myself, the producer, Akiko Kuroda! Hashimoto, being a seasoned media vet, seemed pretty chill in front of the camera, whereas I’m sure I looked like a nervous wreck. Anyway… that’s neither here nor there. This Direct covered all the bases, starting at Bayonetta 2’s basic gameplay and ending with a few new reveals. Whether you preordered the game months ago, or you’re still undecided about making a purchase, I think this Bayonetta 2 special will have some pretty cool info for anyone who tunes in.

This Bayonetta 2 Direct actually had something never before seen in any previous Nintendo Direct: a small slice of live gameplay commentary. We had some script to help us out, but just some. Honestly, it was almost all ad-lib.

We also got to show off some of the game’s co-op mode, Tag Climax. Believe it or not, this was actually the first day Hashimoto and I ever played 2-player together. Of course, we’ve worked together on the game so long that we should be a natural pair by now. At least, you’d think… well, maybe you should just watch the video and see for yourself.

It should go without saying, but there’s so much more you can convey through video about a game than with just words. It was a fun experience that I’m excited to try out again. As always, keep checking out the blog here for more insight on the making of Bayonetta 2.

If you’ve got any other questions about the presentation, just contact me on Twitter:

Don’t be shy about messaging me in English, I’ll just bug  for a translation! See you again!

Tagged: , , , , , , ,

Happy Anniversary!

The Wonderful 101

Filed: Games, The Wonderful 101

Hi everyone, The Wonderful 101 director Kamiya here. A full year has passed since the game was released, but I imagine many of you in Europe and Japan were able to give it a try thanks to the recent Mario Kart 8 promotion.

August 24th was the 1-year anniversary of the release of The Wonderful 101 in Japan but, to be honest, since I still receive messages of encouragement from fans around the world on a daily basis, it really doesn’t feel like that much time has passed. I am truly thankful that so many of you hold the game so dearly.

Now that we have the corny introduction out of the way, let’s get down to business. I have some exciting news to bring you today. We’ve been working behind the scenes, trying to find a way to release something many fans have been asking for, and today I can finally announce it: The Wonderful 101 Official Soundtrack is going to get a digital release! It clocks in at a whopping 127 tracks! This would fill 5 CDs, but we are splitting it up into two tidy volumes, each of which you can download for just $10 a piece. With this you can enjoy every track from the game wherever you are.

The sound quality is a step up from the music in the game itself, so even those of you who spent hours in the Sound Test are in for a treat. The theme song for the game, “The Won-Stoppable Wonderful 100”, has also been remastered. The game version of the track was edited to loop endlessly, so we got Hiroshi (lead BGM composer) to go back and give the song a fitting conclusion. The soundtrack is the only place you’ll find this version.

SoundtrackJacket2 Vol. 1 album jacketAlbum jacket images Vol.2 album jacket

To give you some background on the music direction from my perspective as director, I began by explaining to Hiroshi that I wanted to use an orchestral style to capture the feeling of an epic battle. I imagine the initial impression many people have of the game is a bunch of cute characters frolicking around a colorful world. However, my plan from the start was to create a unique feel by having this light-hearted world juxtaposed with the daunting threat of a massive alien invasion. To do this heroic ballad justice, we needed an equally grand orchestra. A cute exterior with an epic and dark heart; you could almost call the game “a wolf in sheep’s clothing”. Of course, having this ferocity extend to the game’s difficulty may have deviated a bit from the plan…

Another episode that deserves mention is the kerfuffle was had making the theme song. Of course, it was mostly my decision to throw out the near-complete version of the song and start from scratch right before the game went gold that put us in that situation in the first place.

I had decided from the start that the song needed to have vocals, but I just couldn’t seem to settle on an overall style. Near the end of the game’s production, we had PG staff lay vocals over some modern anime style tracks, and the song was coming along nicely when, all of a sudden, it hit me: The song had to be in the style of 60s anime / special effect-filled hero TV shows! The music from “Captain Ultra”, “Captain Scarlet” (the original American version), and “Stingray”, the so-called “supermarionation” series, as well as Japanese TV shows like “Pirate Prince”, “Super Jetter”, and “Ultraman”, while classical, somehow manages to seem fresh when you listen to it nowadays. These songs effortless convey the coolness of the hero, and the more you listen to them, the more you feel your own heroic heart begin to stir. This style perfectly captures what The Wonderful 101 is all about! There was no doubt in my mind when I came to this realization…right before the end of production. I went over to Hiroshi, he looked at me, said I was crazy to ask for such a radical change so late in production, and told me it was impossible.

Just kidding, he totally made it happen! :D

It goes without saying, the subsequent process of finding professional vocalists (in both English and Japanese), getting a handle on the 60s anime / supermarionation style, and arranging the song in the time remaining put quite a load on the already-busy Hiroshi. It was crucial to capture that 1960s flair. As I am sure you can imagine, for Hiroshi, born in 1979, grasping the subtle distinction of 60s shows as opposed to those from the 70s (or even recent ones for that matter), was quite the challenge (and time was short, remember.) But this is Hiroshi we are talking about. Having survived many of my selfish requests in the past, I gave him my absolute faith, hardened my heart, and turned down his submissions one after another. The fruit of our labor: an epic song that, I’m sure all who have heard it will agree, truly burns with the passionate soul of a hero.

Despite all this work on a single track, the soundtrack for The Wonderful 101 managed to reach 5 CDs worth of music. I feel this with each project, but there are really not enough words to express my gratitude to my sound staff. Hiroshi has been with me over many years, and I’m sure many of you would recognize his music, but I cannot forget Takizawa, who backed up Hiroshi in his many hours of need, and quickly adapted to a development schedule filled with curveballs to make all kinds of wonderful tunes. I also want to give a shout out to Ms. Kurokawa, the lone women in our mostly-male sound team, whose deep understanding of hero TV shows and powerful compositions betray her outward kitten-like appearance. Some friends also came from outside the company to lend us their strength over the long development period: Mr. Kondo (whose work many of you may recognize from Ōkami ), Mr. Norihiko Hibino (who I’ve worked with since Bayonetta), and Masato Kouda (an old friend who joined Capcom the same year as me and worked with me on Devil May Cry.) Thank you for putting up with my outlandish requests; I couldn’t have done it without you.

The massive number of tracks in this collection, the music that allows the game to reach its full potential, is a testament to the sound team’s hard work and their desire to give players an unforgettable experience. Everyone, please enjoy listening to these songs as you picture each level in your mind’s eye, and when nobody’s looking, I hope you whisper: “Unite Up!”

The soundtrack will be available for download starting September 15th. If you have any messages, please send them to my twitter:

@PG_Kamiya

Until next time!

Download on iTunes / Sumthing.com. The price per volume is $9.99, with individual tracks available for $0.99.

Tagged: , , , ,