Platinum running the Honolulu Marathon!

Platinum Games

Filed: PlatinumGames

Hello, everyone. PlatinumGames PR head Kazuyo Tsukuma here!


As you may know, PG will be celebrating our 10th anniversary next February. We’ve been hard at work thinking up all kinds of ways to commemorate this milestone over the next year, to show our company spirit and our gratitude towards all our business partners and collaborators – and, of course, our fans.

And what better way to take a running start into our next ten years than by sending an official PlatinumGames team to this year’s Honolulu Marathon?


Though we’re entering as a team, it’s not a relay, and each one of us will be proudly representing Platinum for the full 42.195 kilometers (that’s over 26 miles).

We’ll show Honolulu just how tough PlatinumGames can be!


Without further ado, let’s meet the team!

Hirokazu Takeuchi, animator
Running experience: Four years
Full marathons: Five
Goal time: Four and a half hours

“When you make video games, you spend the better part of every day sitting in front of a computer. So as part of our welfare package, PG employees have free access to a gym. I started going just to get a bit of light exercise, but here I am four years later, ready to challenge my sixth full marathon.

“Though I’ve got plenty of experience, I still haven’t set the record I’m after.

I’ll be gunning for my personal best in Honolulu!”


Takahiro Yasuda, visual effects artist
Running experience: One year
Full marathons: One
Goal time: Three and a half hours

“On my days off, I get up early and go for a 10-kilometer jog with my eldest son. We always stop by a park to play together along the way, and swing by a bakery to pick out fresh baked bread on the way home.

I’m having a lot of fun training every day! I hope to be able to play with my three kids to my fullest forever.

“With the marathon approaching fast, I want my kids to see their dad do his very best!”


Kazuyo Tsukuma, PR
Running experience: Ten months
Full marathons: Zero
Goal time: Five hours

“I’ve gained one kilogram for each of the five years I’ve worked at Platinum – that’s eleven pounds in total! – but this year I resolved to reverse that trend. During my lunch break, I’ve been hitting the gym in our building and running six or seven kilometers a day. In October, I passed 1,000 total kilometers!

Unfortunately, I may have pushed myself a little too hard, and I’ve been out with an injury for a while… But I’m still dead set on finishing the marathon!!”


With only three weeks left until the marathon, our training is already well underway. Back in October, the team attended an orientation session presented by Mr. Yasuhiro Nakajima, head coach of the Shonan Bellmare triathlon team, and Olympic triathlete Machiko Yamawaki (nee Nakanishi).



VFX artist Yasuda (left) helps animator Takeuchi with a warm-up stretch. Feel the burn!


Since our orientation, we’ve put together a Pure Platinum plan for taking on the marathon. Our coaches said we should train by running long distances at a pace that would allow us to keep up a conversation, so the three of us have been meeting up after work once a week and running together for a couple hours at a time.


Here’s a view from one of those night runs! That’s Umeda Sky Building, home of PlatinumGames, in the center of the Osaka skyline.


It’s easy to get carried away and run out of energy well before the end of the course, so working out a target time and pace for the entire marathon is important. But of course, there’s no point if you forget it during the race itself! To help with this, we’ve put together custom PlatinumGames pace chart wristbands. Here’s mine:


It’s also important to stay energized throughout the marathon. There are lots of different types of nutrient gel that marathon runners carry with them, with different flavors, calorie counts, nutritional values… I hope we can pick the right ones!

Personally, I’m looking forward to trying “Sports Yokan” – a sports-friendly version of a traditional Japanese bean snack. Actually, just give me a Rambo-style bandolier full of yokan and I’d be good to go…

We’re taking off from Japan on Friday, December 11, and thanks to the time difference, we’ll arrive in Honolulu on the same day. The race begins at 5 AM on Sunday morning, so Saturday will be our only full, free day in Hawaii. That’s not much time to adjust to the nineteen-hour time difference, so I’m warming up my neck pillow to get a head start on sleeping during the flight!

Please cheer us on as we get ready to head to Honolulu!

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NieR: Automata

Filed: Nier: Automata



First Action-Packed Gameplay Footage Showcases

Joint Project with PlatinumGames


LOS ANGELES (Oct. 29, 2015) – SQUARE ENIX® today unveiled the full name for the upcoming action-packed addition to the NIER series as NieR: AUTOMATA™.

During a stage presentation at Paris Games Week, producer Yosuke Saito (DRAGON QUEST® X / NIER) and director YOKO TARO (Drakengard® / NIER) provided audience members a first-look at the title’s gameplay, which features PlatinumGames’s signature action-oriented combat.

“NIER struck a chord with many passionate gamers.  It was something so special that we felt compelled to heed the fans’ call for a follow-up,” said Saito. “To create the ultimate action-RPG, it dawned on me that a collaboration between PlatinumGames and SQUARE ENIX would be a dream come true”

Accompanying the new trailer were a selection of screenshots and artwork that provides a glimpse of the visually diverse world of NieR: AUTOMATA. The title’s protagonist, “2b,” was designed by Akihiko Yoshida from CyDesignation, artist for FINAL FANTASY® XIV and the BRAVELY DEFAULT series.


The new gameplay trailer is available at the main game page!

NieR: AUTOMATA is currently in development exclusively for the PlayStation®4 computer entertainment system and is not yet rated. Please visit the Entertainment Software Rating Board (ESRB) website at for more information about ratings.

Related Links


About Square Enix, Inc.

Square Enix, Inc. develops, publishes, distributes and licenses SQUARE ENIX, EIDOS® and TAITO® branded entertainment content throughout the Americas as part of the Square Enix Group. The Square Enix Group operates a global network of leading development studios and boasts a valuable portfolio of intellectual property, including: FINAL FANTASY, which has sold over 110 million units worldwide; DRAGON QUEST®, which has sold over 66 million units worldwide; TOMB RAIDER®, which has sold over 42 million units worldwide; and the legendary SPACE INVADERS®. Square Enix, Inc. is a U.S.-based, wholly-owned subsidiary of Square Enix Holdings Co., Ltd.

More information on Square Enix, Inc. can be found at

NieR: Automata © SQUARE ENIX CO., LTD. All Rights Reserved.

NieR: Automata, the NieR: Automata logo, DRAGON QUEST, FINAL FANTASY, SQUARE ENIX, the SQUARE ENIX logo, SPACE INVADERS and TAITO are registered trademarks or trademarks of the Square Enix Group. “PlayStation” is a registered trademark and “PS4” is a trademark of Sony Computer Entertainment. All other trademarks are properties of their respective owners.


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Bayonetta 2 celebrates one year since its release!

Platinum Games

Filed: Uncategorized


Today marks one year since Bayonetta 2 went on sale in Japan, so we gathered some of the development team to celebrate.


Look at this Bayonetta 2 cake!!! It really exceeded our expectations to the point that people were gasping when it was revealed.





It’s hard to believe a year has already passed. All of the staff have since split up to work on different projects, so it was the first time in a while for us all to be in the same room. We put on the game’s soundtrack and shared some development memories.



It just so happens that the game’s director, Yusuke Hashimoto, has his birthday this week as well, so we threw him a little extra surprise.

Bayonetta 2



UI designer Mai Ohkura passes him a gift. Inside was a set of Bayonetta 2 dolls!


Hashimoto is known for his deadpan face most of the time, but today we were able to catch him off guard and get some pretty good reactions.


Okay. Time to eat that cake!



To further celebrate the anniversary, we have also have a message from Hashimoto himself. Please read below.

Hello everyone, how are you? This is Yusuke Hashimoto, the game’s director.

It’s already been one year since Bayonetta 2 went on sale? Time sure does fly.

I’m grateful that I still receive messages from fans regularly, telling me their thoughts about the game. Thanks so much! I thought I’d take a minute to talk about some of the extras we provided in the game. After it was decided that the game would be developed for the Wii U, at some point there were talks about collaborating with Nintendo for some of the games extras (although, by the time this came up Kamiya had already claimed Peach, Link, and Samus for the Wii U remake of the original Bayonetta! Gotta be fast with that guy…)

Therefore, for Bayonetta 2, we decided to shift the focus to collaborations that would have a direct effect on gameplay, instead of them merely being alternate costumes. Bayonetta is somewhat unique in that you can equip weapons to your feet, which led to the idea of using that violent Chain Chomp from the Mario and Zelda series. I still remember being taken back by how quickly Nintendo approved our idea to have their Chain Chomp fly off and explode when it hits the enemy.


Since the Star Fox series was a personal favorite of mine, I requested to add a Star Fox costume and weapon as well. And then I remembered we had a shooting stage. I told the team “Guys, we have to make it so you can ride an Arwing (the high-tech all-terrain combat ship in Star Fox) in this stage.” I knew it was a bit of a tall order but the team didn’t let me down (by the way, did you know that three more Arwings will appear at the end of the stage after finishing it piloting your own?). And of course, it was because we put this in that someone from Nintendo noticed it and thought “maybe we should ask Platinum about that next Star Fox title…” Honestly, I’m still amazed at how much content the staff were able to fit into the game right up until the end, and I believe that their unwillingness to compromise quality led to the opportunity for us to make Star Fox Zero, so I have to express my gratitude to their hard work. We’re back at it again now, trying our best to figure out how to provide unique gameplay experiences that utilize two screens in Star Fox Zero—look forward to it.

I’ll mention one more little behind-the-scenes piece of info while we’re at it. There’s one extra that I wanted to include in the game, but we ultimately had to drop. It was a costume based on Famicom Tantei Club (A Japanese-only detective adventure game for the Nintendo Entertainment System), the first video game I ever finished. We were thinking that dialog could kind of fly out from Bayonetta’s weapon when she attacked, and this dialog could change the longer you held the attack button. We were also thinking that wearing the costume could cause “incidents” to occur in Noatun, but it just pushed us way over capacity so we eventually had to cut it. Alas J


One more thing before I go… We’ve seen a lot of Bayonetta merchandise up until now, but I just want you to know there are still things on the horizon that will blow your pants straight off, so be sure to keep an eye out! And as always, thank you for playing.


Bayonetta 2 Director

Yusuke Hashimoto

Let’s welcome the new recruits!

Platinum Games

Filed: PlatinumGames

The annual rainy season has ended, and it’s finally time for summer in Osaka!

But rain or no rain, at this time of the year, PlatinumGames always organizes a big welcoming party for all of the new talent that joined the company in April, and today we’d like to show you a glimpse of the insanity that tends to go down at these parties.

The first thing that is worth pointing out is that, despite this being a welcome party for the new employees, it’s actually the newcomers themselves who have to provide the entertainment to their seniors and superiors for the evening.

This year we had a total of 9 fresh, new recruits! Last year, it was pretty evenly distributed between men and women, but this year, for some reason, only a group of guys had made the cut.
This meant that some of the existing male employees at the company did not expect much to look at (cosplaying female employees are always popular at these events), but as it turned out, they got an eyeful.


For some reason, the opening act involved Isao Negishi, who’s been a game designer at PG for 5 years, being summoned to the stage with veteran programmer Noriyuki Ohtani to do a bizarre (and painful-looking) stunt with a rubber band.


But fortunately, the audience was placated with a pair of pretty legs in a school uniform when one of the guys sang a lovely AKB 48 medley.


As you can see, it went down a storm.


And the crowd got perhaps a bit too rowdy.


Some acts were even more risqué and featured pretty much full frontal nudity.

Don’t worry, he was wearing underwear.





All in all, the crowd had a blast, and it was a very successful and entertaining event. The new recruits had apparently spent weeks preparing and rehearsing their acts, but fortunately, the pay-off was proportionate.

Thanks everyone, and welcome to the club!

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The birthday event gets an upgrade!

Platinum Games

Filed: PlatinumGames

Remember Lunch with the President, where president Minami treats employees who have a birthday that month to lunch? Well, it got a big upgrade.

Responding to requests for “more time to talk” and “alcoholic beverages”, Minami decided to make it a party with wine and appetizers this year. Instead of lunchtime, it starts at 5:30, so that everyone can fully enjoy their food and drink and then head right home.


On the day of the party, everyone who had a birthday that month gathered together, joined by the management. From veteran employees to new grads who just joined the company this April, everyone raised their glasses for a toast.


The conversation topics flew, but as you might imagine, the discussion quickly turned to games. Minami told someone, “That pitch for a new game looked awesome! I hope we get to make it!” A veteran employee gave some heartfelt advice to a new game designer who was worrying about his game designs: “Stressed out? Well, it’s just gonna get worse from here on. Keep thinking of ideas, and don’t give up!”







Later on, a certain individual started demanding birthday cake! Minami handed a 10,000 yen bill (approx. $80) to company executive Sato and told him to run, not walk, to a cake shop.

From what I hear, the party lasted late into the evening. :)


Inaba speaks at Bit-Summit

Platinum Games

Filed: Community, PlatinumGames, Uncategorized

Last weekend was the 3rd Bit-Summit, a game festival held in Kyoto where indie Japanese developers are given the opportunity to showcase their latest projects. Last year’s BitSummit saw attendance rise from 200 to 5,000, demonstrating the growing interest in the indie community of gaming in Japan.


This year also proved to be a success for the show: attendance was high, and there were plenty of interesting titles displayed along the floor. Some were from larger indie teams such as Q-Games, and some were projects developed entirely by a team of one.



(Even 8-4, the localization company who helped us out with Metal Gear Rising, were extending their scope to the indie scene)


(Chance meeting with star PlatinumGames game designer Abebe)

In the midst of all of this was a special talk featuring PlatinumGames’ own Atsushi Inaba.

“Having been a producer all these years, I feel indebted to the community, and want to share what I’ve learned with smaller developers who may just be starting out,” Inaba expressed to the crowd.


“There was a time when I was in your shoes: the original Phoenix Wright was developed with a team size of around six people. Viewtiful Joe only had about 13. Even when we started PlatinumGames, we weren’t the size we are now. We were a small developer that put everything on the line just to  cut a deal with a publisher and try to make the game we envisioned.”

“I can’t say much about the West, but while Japan’s indie market had almost no presence ten years ago, I feel that’s changed now. In Japan, there has always been a stigma towards standing out and being independent. People think joining a large company and becoming part of the system is the correct thing to do. But independent developers continue to expand and make their place in the industry.”


“I think the most interesting games I saw here today, however, weren’t games that tried to bank off of the indie feel, but games that chased after a truly original concept and wanted to take gaming somewhere that it hasn’t been yet. At Platinum, I discuss the same kind of possibilities with Kamiya on a daily basis. He’s a bit crazy, but I think that in order to be a creator, that should be the norm.”


It was a brief talk in the middle of a long day, but the speech no doubt made an impact on many of the start-up groups who had assembled at the event.

Individuality in Game Development (Part 4)

Platinum Games

Filed: Games, PlatinumGames

(Continues from Part 3)

Kai: Sometimes it’s not until things have finally taken shape that Kamiya realizes they have to change. I can understand why he feels the need to make those changes at the 11th hour, but due to schedule and budget constraints, it’s not something that is usually done. At the end of the day, however, what he does, he does for the players.

Shibata: When talking about the actual development floor, the topic usually shifts to Kamiya pretty quick, but I think Executive Producer Atsushi Inaba is even more impressive. Even a small change in the schedule or budget can put you in the red, but he manages to steer us through every time.

Kai: After working with him for so long, I couldn’t agree more. Especially at a place like PlatinumGames, where we put so much focus on quality, he allows us to put out games we can be proud of.

Shibata: Putting out games that are beloved by players is one thing, but games take a lot of money and time, and if you can’t keep paying your staff your company won’t be around for long. I respect Inaba for that – if it wasn’t for his management, Kamiya wouldn’t be able to do all the crazy stuff he does.

Kai: The games we produce are a result of them working in sync. Shibata, as a game designer you work as Kamiya’s right-hand man, helping him come up with ideas. But if given full creative control, what kind of game would you like to make yourself?

Shibata: I don’t have a preference about game structure, but I’d love to make a game with a lot of eroticism and violence, things that are usually a bit of a taboo in the real world. I think what games need are an edge, showing the dark side of the world as much as society will allow.

Kai: Why is that?

Shibata: Let me put it this way: there are acts that, in the real world, would be destructive or hurt others that, in games, are perfectly harmless. Of course, you could say the same about animation, comics, novels, etc., but since games allow you to actually take control of a character in that world it somehow makes you want to break the rules that exist in our society. Allowing people to do evil things, rather than things they would be praised for in real life, is a tried and true tenet of game design. In fact, I am always trying to sneak that kind of content into our games. To an extent the director of that particular project allows, of course.

Kai: I didn’t know you felt that way. Games are separate from the real world, so I can understand the desire to make game worlds something that would never be possible in reality.
How do you feel about the recent changes in production environments?

Shibata: Since we’ve started doing everything with 3D CG, every team has gotten more specialized and separated. I’m not a fan of this. Back in the 2D days, there were only two classes of graphic designer: objects and environments*. Nowadays the object group alone has splintered into various groups. You have design, modeling, animation, effects, and so on. Sometimes I feel that having so much granular separation takes some of the fun out of creating. Even if we do have these different categories, I think it’s important to give our young employees a chance to experience a wide range of tasks, to keep them from being pigeonholed into a single specialization.
*Objects: creation of the main characters, weapons, and items that appear in the game. Environments: creation of backgrounds.

Kai: It might be bad for efficiency, but I’m sure they enjoy the variety. When working on Street Fighter II, I remember that the texture of Ryu’s Hadoken and Dhalsim’s Yoga Fire were completely different. It was clear that those two effects were made by two different people, but in a way there was something nice about that lack of uniformity.

Shibata: I understand the need for efficiency, but there is something fun about making an entire character by yourself. It would be great to handle everything from the original design and modeling to the animation and effects.

Kai: For stuff like that, it would be nice to have an environment where we could just pick from a handful of options floating in the air and say “leave this job to me,” and have full control over it. I feel that this is a more healthy approach than doing what you’re told and then waiting until you’re given your next task. Even when straddling multiple sections, I’d like to consistently have the type of attitude where people can just go: “Hey, if nobody is going to work on this, can I give it a shot?” Whether that kind of system would actually be viable is another thing altogether. Back when I was just starting out I had no experience, and I just wanted to do everything, so I would always wonder “why doesn’t anyone give me anything to do?” or “They should just leave this all to me!” Of course, if someone actually HAD given me free rein to do something I’m sure I would have ended up going “wait, I can’t do this at all!” But it is thanks to experiences like those that I became who I am today. I just wanted to try everything that had to do with making games, even if it meant I just had to input quiz questions. I think there are not enough of these types of environments in game development today.

Shibata: Maybe you’re right. My goal from here on out will be to simply leave something for Inaba that will sell really well. Since we live in a time of tight schedules and even tighter budgets, I just want to help Inaba by giving him something that actually sells really well. It’s the really good games that earn their place in history, so rather than focusing on short-term sales, I want to make something that has a lot of staying power. PlatinumGames was conceived as a company that would strive for more than just financial success, but making good games takes money. For that reason I want to make something for Inaba that I think will sell well and survive the test of time in terms of quality. And with the money we earn from that game, we can keep on making more crazy games in the future. That will be my goal for the time being. I’m not as young as I used to be, though, so I want to make a hit in the next 4 or 5 years.

Kai: That’s a good goal to start off with. After all, if we can’t sell any games now, you’ll never be able to make you dream game down the line. And I do feel like I just get to make whatever pops into my head. I always keep in mind that when you aim to create things, you cannot afford to compromise on your vision. We are able to cross those barriers and speak our minds to staff in other sections. We aim to create an environment where people on the development floor are able to share their own points of view, even if they differ from that of the director or producer.

Shibata: To be honest, I’m not really interested in the particulars of the development environment itself. No matter what situation you may find yourself in, those that can manage to keep up will keep up.

Kai: That phrase nicely sums up your stoic approach to making things, haha. However, as someone who learned a lot in an environment that allowed for trial and error, I’d like to ensure that we make our studio that kind of place as well.

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E3 2015 Report from Game Designer Isao Negishi!

NieR: Automata

Filed: Games, Nier: Automata, Star Fox Zero, TRANSFORMERS: Devastation

PlatinumGames announced three new titles at E3 2015! (More info here.)

As with every year, several PlatinumGames employees attended E3 as a learning experience. Fifth-year up-and-coming game designer Isao Negishi writes about his trip.


Hello, everyone! I’m Isao Negishi, a game designer. Just like every year, an observational group from PlatinumGames attended E3! Though actually, this was my first E3 and my first time ever in the US, so the entire trip was a new and exciting experience for me.

Since you’re looking at this website, you probably already know, but this year at E3, three new titles were announced that PlatinumGames is involved in developing: Star Fox Zero, Transformers: Devastation, and NieR New Project (temporary name).

Both the number and the content of the titles must have been a big surprise for everybody!

Some fans even wrote things like “PlatinumGames won E3 this year!” (That’s probably an exaggeration, but I am happy about it personally, haha.)

All right – let’s take a look at this year’s E3!

I’m a member of the NieR New Project development team, so on the first day, I got to attend the Square-Enix conference.

Finally, it was time to get started. This was the opening screen. Here you can see prominent titles like Just Cause 3, Deus Ex, Rise of the Tomb Raider, and more.

NieR New Project was a surprise announcement, so it wasn’t on the screen. (Heh heh.)

First at bat was Just Cause 3! And second was…

NieR New Project!!!

I’m a fifth-year game designer, but it was my first time to see a title I was working on being revealed live right before my eyes.

Of course, I had seen the trailer several times already and knew what it was about. But seeing it play on the big screen with the volume loud, and sharing that experience with everyone in the theater and the thousands of viewers watching live online, felt completely different from usual.

I was beside myself wondering how everyone would react. As the trailer played on and everyone learned that it was NieR, how would they react? Joy? Disappointment? Indifference? I had no idea.

I didn’t know that directly witnessing their reactions would be such a thrill. And at E3, the biggest exhibition in the world! I am one lucky guy.

So I wanted to watch the screen and the attendees’ reactions at the same time. For a moment I couldn’t decide which to focus on, but I ended up turning my eyes toward the screen and picking up their reactions with my ears.

The audience reaction was not over-the-top excitement. Instead, the attendees caught their breath quietly. I heard whispers of excitement, like…

“…It’s NieR!”


This is just my personal opinion, but I thought this reaction was actually very NieR-esque, in a good way. :)

Of course, there are also the guys who get THIS excited:

Watch the conference here.

After the Square-Enix conference, I walked over to the E3 venue.

At E3, the first thing that jumped out at me was Uncharted 4: A Thief’s End!

The first day opened at 12, so the lobby was packed with industry people waiting to get in.

There were a lot of displays in the lobby!

The interceptor from Mad Max!

Dark Souls III display. Black water is spewing out from the blue corpse.

I even met a guy with Bayonetta immortalized on his arm!!!

When I spoke to him, he asked me, “Do you like Bayonetta too? Did you buy Bayo 2?” After that, I had to reveal my identity, and we exchanged a firm handshake.

As you can see, there was a lot of excitement even before the doors opened. It was like a party.

Then finally it was 12 – time for the doors to open. The crowd raised a wild roar as they entered the show floor. That’s America for you – everyone was hyped.

On the first day, I wandered around the third party booths until it was time for the Star Fox Zero Treehouse Live.

This is the Street Fighter V booth. This very glamorous Cammy was kind enough to take a picture with me.

Asassin’s Creed Syndicate demo at Ubisoft.

This is the demo for Rigs, a first-person robot battle arena game that uses the Morpheus.

Finally, it was time to go, so I headed to the Nintendo booth. There, I found that Star Fox Zero, collaboratively developed by Nintendo and PlatinumGames, was showcased front and center!

There were huge lines in front of the demo stations. Everyone was whiling away the time playing Smash Brothers on their 3DS.

Then the Treehouse Live event began! Hayashi-san, the director at Nintendo, and Hashimoto, the director here at PG, explained the game as they played.
Watch the Treehouse Live segment here.

The audience seating was full. Everyone’s face looked so serious. The announcement must have made a big impact. As proof of that, I constantly heard Star Fox being mentioned around me after this event.

Some people who noticed from our ID cards that we were PG staff even asked to shake our hands and told us to keep up the good work!

Next door, at the Mario Maker booth, I was lucky enough to get my DS signed by Charles Martinet, the voice of Mario!

On the second day, I encountered NieR New Project producer Saito-san and director Yoko-san right after their NieR New Project interview at the Square-Enix booth! They struck a pose when I pointed my camera at them.

There was a live event for Transformers: Devastation at the Twitch booth featuring producer Kurooka and director Saito from PG, but I couldn’t make it.

Liz saw the event – check it out on her blog here!

Well, what with one thing and another, my E3 trip was over before I knew it.

Because E3 is a trade show, I thought that only a narrow range of content would be shown, but that turned out not to be the case at all. There were spectacular events and displays all over the show floor. The attendees’ pure passion for gaming made a big impression on me. Being right there live for all the reactions and excitement was a truly worthwhile experience.

Finally, I’m sure that we at PlatinumGames gave all of you some great surprises at this year’s E3.

Rest assured that we’re working hard to make an even bigger impact next year. Get ready to be blown away!

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E3 2015 Highlights

NieR: Automata

Filed: Nier: Automata, PlatinumGames, Star Fox Zero, TRANSFORMERS: Devastation

Hello, everyone. Liz from the localization team at PlatinumGames here!

Today I’ll be telling you about my first E3. Getting to go to E3 was actually a big moment for me – something I dreamed of when I was younger. So, did it live up to the hype? Let’s find out.

This was an especially exciting year to be at E3 as a PlatinumGames employee, because we announced three new titles! I hope all of you are excited for Transformers: Devastation, NieR New Project, and Star Fox Zero. We sure are!

Without further ado, let’s get started. Imagine yourself in sunny LA…

The day before the conference, the guys and I had some extra time, so I decided to take them to a video game store. Now, coming all the way from Japan, I didn’t want to take them to any old chain store, so I did some research and discovered an awesome retro game store in Los Angeles.
The folks there seemed to be excited to meet us when we mentioned that we were from PlatinumGames. Platinum games were prominently displayed in the store windows! Looks like these guys are fans.

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We got a kick out of the old consoles, some literally lying around.

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2015-06-15 11.43.10
We were also amused by some recent Splatoon-related decorating that went on…
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The next day, it was off to E3.

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2015-06-17 14.26.46
I was somewhat overwhelmed by the conglomeration of people lined up outside the halls, waiting to get in on the first day. It was modest chaos. Forget lining up, these guys are just milling around.


2015-06-16 11.15.10

As soon as the doors opened, there was a rush to the Star Fox Zero demo. Lines for this were long throughout the convention.

2015-06-16 12.36.38
In the afternoon, it was time for our very own Yusuke Hashimoto to appear on Treehouse Live with Miyamoto-san and other Nintendo staff to talk about Star Fox Zero.
(Watch here!)

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Hashimoto did a good job on stage, don’t you think?

There were also other Platinum sightings throughout the con. Of course, it was fun to see the NieR trailer playing at the Square Enix booth. Judging from the crowds, many people seemed intrigued.

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On the second day, I watched Kenji Saito (Director) and Atsushi Kurooka (Producer) talk about Transformers on Twitch! They had several appearances throughout the con, so they were pros at appearing in front of the camera by then. Great job, guys!

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Luckily, I also had a fair amount of time to wander around and see what else E3 had to offer.
One thing that made an impression on me was what a big theme VR was this year. It was all over.

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One of my coworkers reported trying it and feeling a little sick, though! I’ll give it a try… one of these days. ;)

Of course, the console makers’ booths were gargantuan.

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But the third parties weren’t far behind!
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Here are a few more sights from around the convention:

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Con-goers also appreciated the retro gaming area:

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Personally, I had a lot of fun at the indie games area. I enjoyed checking out Wattam (a Katamari Damacy successor), and an Alice-in-Wonderland-based game that was actually an interactive pop-up book.

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So, what other games did I play? I mostly eschewed the long lines, but I did find time to check out Fable: Legends, the new Amplitude, and Life is Strange. I spent a long time immersed in the Life is Strange demo. I’m a sucker for mystery/adventure games, probably the result of my childhood obsession with Myst.

Finally, I have to set aside a moment to discuss one of my other loves in life – food. I really had to restrain myself, or this blog post would have been a long parade of food and drink shots. With the excuse of exposing my Japanese co-workers to American culture, we visited a different restaurant each night. They were pleasantly surprised by the California rolls!

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In conclusion:
Well, it’s hard to wrap up such an overwhelming experience in the format of a blog post. I had been to PAX and other conventions many times before, but this was my first time attending an industry event like E3. While the noise, lighting, and sheer number of people were exhausting, the love and excitement for gaming was truly infectious. It was particularly gratifying to see and hear the anticipation for the three new titles we announced. E3 was a great reminder of what this job is really all about. I was also glad to run into many game industry friends and acquaintances and renew some old ties.

So, that’s it! I hope you enjoyed this report a fraction as much as I enjoyed attending E3, and stay tuned for more. Next up: more Scalebound news at Gamescom!

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E3 – A Message from Tatsuya Minami

Platinum Games

Filed: Games, PlatinumGames

E3 is the biggest event in the games industry, and I am very pleased to announce our development of multiple new titles during this year’s show.

Each of the titles we announced is a new kind of challenge for our studio. The reason we’ve taken on these projects is simple. We believe that they are all opportunities for us to exercise our strengths as developers, and collaborations like these lead to final products that both we ourselves, and our fans, will find thrilling.

Our forte is innovative and satisfying action mechanics delivered in an exhilarating package. By playing to our strengths, we believe we can help these beloved IPs shine even brighter – nothing would make us happier than giving our fans exciting new gameplay experiences with these titles.

Finally, even though we haven’t shared anything new with you at this year’s E3, we are working full steam on the development of Scalebound, our next flagship, original creation. We’ll probably be able to share some new information with you at this year’s Gamescom in August.

We can’t wait to continue showing you what is next for PlatinumGames.

PlatinumGames, Inc.

Tatsuya Minami, President and CEO

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